Posts made in April, 2014

Formulario de Inscripción para el Foro Nacional

Posted by on Apr 28, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Formulario de Inscripción para el Foro Nacional Use el formulario abajo para inscribirse en el foro nacional sobre los crímenes de la policía que toma lugar el 16-17 de mayo.  Inscríbase ahora aunque no pueda pagar en este momento.  Ud. puede volver aquí más tarde para pagar o también puede pagar en el foro, pero recomendamos que Ud. pague ahora si puede.  La matrícula cuesta $75, $30 para estudiantes y $5 para personas sin empleo. Ningún solicitante será rechazado. Please enter the security code: Security Code: Please enter the captcha verification code....

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Programación para el Foro Nacional de delitos policiales

Posted by on Apr 23, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

  PROGRAMACIÓN PARA EL FORO NACIONAL DE DELITOS POLICIALES 16 y 17 de mayo 2014 University of Chicago International House, 1414 E. 59th St. Formulario de Inscripción para el Foro Nacional   VIERNES, 16 DE MAYO 2014 – ¿DÓNDE?: University of Chicago International House, 1414 E.59th St. 9:00 – Registro  9:30 – Sesión plenaria de apertura ‘Policía como la vanguardia de represión en todos los asuntos sociales, económicos y políticos.’ 10.00 –   Panel y discussion  “La Lucha por responsabilidad policial en Chicago, Nueva York, Austin TX, Los Ángeles y Oakland,” 12.15 – Almuerzo   1.15 – Discusiόn y sesiones interactive primerá parte: conversation facliitada – interacciones entre los participantes y presentadores  • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra los indocumentados y inmigrantes • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra el movimiento obrero y los trabajadores • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra la comunidad LGBT • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra los movimientos de paz y solidaridad • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra las mujeres • El Movimiento Nacional para terminar con delitos policiales basado en el racismo institucionalizado • Delitos policiales en una Nación Prisiónera 3.00 – Descanso  3.15    Discusiόn y sesiones interactive segued parte: sesión en moción – todos juntos haciendo progreso para crecer el movimiento • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra los indocumentados y inmigrantes • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra el movimiento obrero y los trabajadores • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra la comunidad LGBT • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra los movimientos de paz y solidaridad • El Movimiento Nacional para detener los crímenes policiales contra las mujeres • El Movimiento Nacional para terminar con delitos policiales basado en el racismo institucionalizado • Delitos policiales en una Nación Prisiónera 5:00 – Descanso 5.30 – “EnLy10” (Enlighten – Illuminar) Taller interactiva de Conozca sus derechos para jóvenes con sesión de micrófono abierto 8.00 – Descanso SÁBADO, 17 DE MAYO 2014 – ¿DÓNDE?: University of Chicago International House, 1414 E.59th St. 9:00 – Desayuno ligero 10:00 – Reportar y compartir discusiόnes del viernes sobre las sesiones interactivas 11:30 – Perspectivas para coordinar a un nivel nacional “Acciones Unidas para terminar con delitos policiales” 1:00 – Palabras de clausura 1:30 – Aplazar EVENTOS DE TARDE – ¿DÓNDE?: Trinity United Church of Christ, 400 W. 95th St. 5:00 – Cena para los Premios de Derechos Humanos ($80 – La entrada cuando te registras en el Foro) 7:00 – Mitin con discurso e informe sobre el Foro dada por Angela...

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The Case of the NATO 3: ‘Divide and Conquer’ New Face of Old Tactics

Posted by on Apr 16, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The Case of the NATO 3: ‘Divide and Conquer’ New Face of Old Tactics Police Crimes and Political Suppression of the Occupy Movement     The NATO 3, Brian Jacob Church, Jared Chase, and Brent Betterly, are three political prisoners held by the Chicago Police Department following the international NATO Summit protests in 2012. On April 25th, they will be brought before Circuit Court Judge Thaddeus Wilson, to be sentenced for a felony charge each of intent to commit arson. Wilson’s courtroom will no doubt be filled with representatives of the state’s attorney’s office and corporate journalists waiting to hear the judge’s decision. The sentencing date will be one of the final elements of the ongoing victimization of the NATO 3 by the Chicago Police, who have falsely charged and prosecuted these three activists. The case of the NATO 3 is important for the struggle against police violence in the city of Chicago, because it shows how the police enforce political suppression as well as racist violence in black and brown communities. In regards to political suppression, the case played a major role in undermining momentum behind the Occupy movement, especially in Chicago. Moreover, the lies told about Betterly, Church, and Chase, have been vulgarly exploited by police officials and politicians, to justify massive financial payouts for the police, as well as the expansion of surveillance technology in the Chicagoland area. The frame-up of the NATO 3 was the final product of a systematic Chicago Police surveillance operation, deployed in the lead up to the 2012 NATO Summit. The operation was designed to create the shocking appearance of a so-called terrorist threat to be televised on the nightly news. Of course, such stories told by the police and the State’s Attorney’s Office are not just untrue lies, they are symbolic weapons used by the state to support the unjust incarceration of political activists. The truth is that the case serves as an example of the general tendency of power to internally divide social movements through categories of normativity and abnormality, coupled with the subsequent exclusion of those who become devalued as political abnormals. Following the very public violence used against the original Occupy encampments in November of 2011, the repression accomplished during the NATO Summit was much more covert and symbolically intelligent. State power created an artificial, two-sided difference within a movement with a diversity of political causes and opinions. The rigid binary established was between good protestors, who are peaceful, law-abiding, and generally in the majority versus bad protestors, those who are named by power as dangerous and who thus must be violently silenced. This divisionary binary, a shared vocabulary of truth produced by police infiltrators, political figures, corporate media, and liberal non-profit institutions provided the social narrative used by Anita Alvarez, Gerry McCarthy and other representatives of power to throw the NATO 3 in cages. In what follows we will attempt to describe the creation of this split between the good/bad protestor, as well as how and why it was used to criminalize the Brent Betterly, Brian Jacob Church and Jared Chase. The Good/Bad Protestor: The internal division of communities against one another is an age-old tactic of social control. Divisions are accomplished by producing a sense of difference and marginalizing those recognized as the other, the one who differs from the normal ‘socially acceptable’ side of the division. Protest movements against war and economic oppression are constantly attacked by false divisions between socially acceptable protestors and those who are labeled as dangerous abnormal protestors and who must be punished by the police for their abnormality. Such a binary between the good and the bad is a symbolic division with no basis in real life, instead, it is a false perception created by representatives of the police and other branches of the government and the corporate media. Nonetheless, this false perception justifies the persecution of activists by police powers, and thus has very serious consequences. Different power-relations throughout American society involve the use of similar symbolic divisions to authorize the actions of...

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National Forum on Police Crimes: Breakout Sessions

Posted by on Apr 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

National Forum on Police Crimes: Breakout Sessions Descriptions and Session Leaders   Location: University of Chicago International House, 1414 E. 59th St. To register: Online registration Read the full call at: National Forum on Police Crimes/ See full  National Forum Agenda May 16- 17, 2014 en español    follet para la programación foro nacional All breakout sessions take place on Friday May 16:  1:15pm – 3.00pm Breakout sessions – Part 1: Facilitated conversation, breakout participants and workshop presenters 3.00pm   –   Break 3.15pm- 5.00pm Breakout sessions – Part 2: Working session making progress together building a stronger movement Report-backs from breakouts are scheduled for Saturday May 17th, 10.00am – 11.30am   The National Movement to Stop Police Crimes Against the Undocumented and other Immigrants The proposed goal of the breakout is “to encourage alliances to resist police crimes committed against people on the basis of their (actual or perceived) immigration status and to discuss how denial of legal and human rights of immigrants affects the community as a whole.”
 Session Leaders: Members of  Moratorium on Deportations Campaign   The National Movement to Stop Police Crimes Against the Labor Movement and Working People The proposed goal of the breakout is “to encourage labor activists and labor unions to work in solidarity with community groups and to encourage a broader coalition to resist police crimes committed against unemployed, undocumented, and working people, particularly those struggling for improved economic conditions and labor rights.” Session Leader: Mike Siviwe Elliot Bio: Mike Siviwe Elliott, a longtime labor, community and international activist, raised in Detroit, Mi and is a third generation member of the United Auto Workers (UAW). Currently Chairs several labor related groups, including,  the Union Solidarity Committee at UAW Local 551, Job Action Committee of Chicago Chapter of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists and is the Labor Secretary of the Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression.   The National Movement to Stop Police Crimes Against the LGBTQ Community A discussion of how the policing of sexual and gender non conformity is and has always been a tool of race based law enforcement in the U.S.. Speakers will discuss how police repression and resistance to it have always been central themes to gay life in the U.S., and how LGBTQ people of color continue to face police repression by the enforcement of quality of life police practices in Chicago and nationwide. Speakers include:  Joey Mogul, a partner at the People’s Law Office and a co-author of Queer (In)Justce: The Criminalizaiton of LGBT People in the United States (Beacon Press, 2011). Owen Daniel-McCarter, collective member at the Transformative Justice Law Project (TJLP) and Staff Attorney at the TransLife Center, a project of Chicago House. Keyshia LeMorris is a young black transgender woman from Chicago.  She works with a number of advocacy organizations doing outreach and other social service work and was co-organizer of the 2014 “Dream It, Speak It, Do It” LGBT Homeless Youth Summit.   The National Movement to Stop Police Crimes Against Peace and Solidarity Movements The proposed goal of the breakout is “to build support for the rights of peace and solidarity and anti-capitalist movements and to expose and resist police crimes against them including agents provocateur, frame ups, false arrests, and imprisonment. Also, to build support for all movements to organize and protest peacefully.                                                       Session Leaders: Joe Iosbaker and Hatem Abudayyeh Bios: Hatem Abudayyeh and Joe Iosbaker had their homes raided by the FBI in September, 2010. They were subpoenaed to a federal grand jury investigating 23 anti-war and international solidarity activists for allegations of providing “material support” to terrorist organizations in Palestine and Colombia. Hatem Abudayyeh is...

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