Posts made in December, 2014

This Struggle is for the Stouthearted and We Need Winter Soldiers

Posted by on Dec 31, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

THIS STRUGGLE IS FOR THE STOUT-HEARTED AND WE NEED WINTER SOLDIERS Frank Chapman, Field Organizer Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression We welcome everyone thirsting for justice, everyone who is sick and tired of racist injustice and who believes in our inalienable democratic right to protest against injustices perpetrated against us. We welcome into our movement not only the racially oppressed but all oppressed people who want to and are willing to stand up and fight-back. The struggle to stop police crimes through community control of the police is a broad-based people’s movement open to all who wish to join. So when some members of the New York City Council joined this movement and were in the streets chanting, “I Can’t Breath!” The movement welcomed them. What happened? Two police officers are killed and yesterday’s allies are turned into today’s opposition. Why? Check out this brief excerpt from the New York Times: For some who share the protesters’ concerns, the insistence on pressing on in spite of the funerals is damaging. “I don’t think the protesters do themselves a favor by protesting until after these officers are laid to rest,” said Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president.(NYT Christmas Day) While the Mayor and the Bronx borough president are free to leave the protest for whatever political or moral reasons they care to invoke they cannot in anyway restrict the mass movement that has erupted against police crimes by calling for no protest “until after these officers are laid to rest.” We believe that they knew, given the breadth and depth of this movement, putting out a call for a moratorium on protest would be futile, and yet they went along with the FOP and did it anyway. The NYPD FOP obviously did it to divide the movement. They wanted to separate the sunshine patriots from the winter soldiers. And let us concede that for the moment they have. To sharpen my point I need to define sunshine patriot and winter soldier. A quote from Tom Paine might help, said he: “These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.” Using this historical yardstick the Mayor de Blasio and Bronx borough president Diaz were the sunshine patriots and the winters soldiers were in the streets. One of them, Marvin Knight, a 71-year-old black retiree from Brooklyn, said it was absurd for any politician to ask that the protests stop. “This is America,” he told HuffPost at the rally. “Why should we stop doing what we know is right?” Knight added that de Blasio’s call to halt demonstrations infringed on protesters’ First Amendment rights. “Why should our freedoms of assembly and speech be curtailed because a deranged man killed two officers?” he said. We salute brother Knight and all the winter soldiers for staying the course, for this struggle is for the stouthearted and we need winter soldiers.  ...

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Stop the War on Our People – Frank Chapman

Posted by on Dec 31, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

    STOP THE WAR ON OUR PEOPLE Frank Chapman, Field Organizer Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression The murder, this past Sunday, of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18 year old African American, in Ferguson, Missouri has resulted in an uprising of the people. We send heart-felt condolences to the family and friends of Michael Brown and stand in solidarity with the sisters and brothers in Ferguson. The media has focused on the so-called “rioting” and the police with dogs, clubs and guns ready were poised for making the usual blood bath to put down the rebellion. But the determined will of the people to stop police crimes also erupted in organized mass protest and “cries of no justice no peace!” We can say to our sisters and brothers in the struggle in Ferguson thank you for not being quiet and tame in the face of death stalking our communities like a hungry lion. Thank you for your outrage and for finding the courage to stand up to police who are more and more behaving like an organized lynch mob. Criminals who operate under the authority of the badge are the worst kind of criminals because the system will not jail them or prosecute them when they commit crimes against African Americans and Latinos. So we say to the powers that be don’t you dare counsel us about “rioting” until you stop these lawless acts of cops who kill and brutalize our people with impunity. Who do you think you are that you can murder and abuse us and spew your racist venom at us and then chide us about being outraged? Let’s look at some underlying realities. The population of Ferguson is at least 60% African American and its poverty is double Missouri’s average. While Black people are struggling with poverty there is also in Ferguson Emerson Electric, a $24 billion company with 132,000 employees all around the world. In an area where there are billions of dollars in revenue poverty is common place and police repression rampant.  This is the reality of the United States of North America which claims to be concerned about democracy in Iraq but can’t take a stand against the unwarranted violence perpetrated against its own citizens and residents. We must make this a political struggle because we are confronted with political repression with a racist cutting edge. In our righteous anger we must not just engage in rants of rage. We must start now to organize people to force our political representatives to enact laws that will empower the people to hold the police accountability for the crimes they commit. We need a strong democratic voice through an elected Civilian Police Accountability Council. That’s what we are fighting for here in Chicago but police crimes are not confined to Chicago we must fight for this everywhere. Ferguson included.        ...

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Glorious Uprising – Looking at Ferguson

Posted by on Dec 31, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

  Glorious Uprising – Looking at Ferguson  Frank Chapman, Field Organizer, Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression   When I look at Ferguson and this glorious uprising of our youth, their taking of the helm of rebellion, I cannot help but appreciate that Rebellion is like a wall of fire protecting our people from the violent aggressions of our oppressors. I will never condemn the people of Ferguson for rising up against those who think they have a right to murder us in the name of law and order. We have an inalienable right to rise up against this inhuman criminal justice system, period. This is not an issue to be debated but an issue that will be decided in the dirt and blood of mass struggle. This struggle will be spontaneous and organized, violent and non-violent, moral and physical and ultimately about political power. The powers that be from the White House to the State House have no moral authority to tell us when, where and how to protest while they refuse to hold the police accountable and address the economic devastation of our...

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Stop Police Crimes News Letter Monthly Column- Final Shot Take 1

Posted by on Dec 17, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

CATCH UP ON  PAST ISSUES AND SIGN UP FOR STOP POLICE CRIMES NEWSLETTER Stop Police Crimes Newsletter & Press Release Archive Stop Police Crimes News Letter Monthly Column – Final Shot Take 1     Issue: April, 2015         STOP & SHOOT Steve Craig, Stop Police Crimes Organizing CommitteeChicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression The unchecked power of the police has been further exposed in recent weeks, its raw racism revealed. It begins with the ‘stop’. The cop decides who to stop with his or her observations, weighted with the targeting tool of racial profiling—cop as judge. The stop proceeds and suspicions or infractions confirmed, a broken tail-light, a loose cigarette, a half-smoked blunt—cop as jury. Reach for a wallet, a cell phone, raise your hands, resist or run. Cop fears are ‘justified’, and the shooting starts—cop as executioner. Another black or brown body lies still, dehumanized and defiled. The ACLU recently released a study of police stops made on Chicago’s streets using data supplied by the CPD. Their report revealed some staggering statistics. For instance, during the four month period from April through August of 2011 Chicago police made over a quarter million street stops that did not result in an arrest, issuing ‘contact cards’ fattening the files of ‘usual suspects’. This was four times the rate of stops, on a per capita basis, made by the NYPD at the height of New York’s notorious ‘stop-and-frisk’ policy, a policy that ushered in a new mayor on his promise to end the practice. Seventy-two percent of all Chicago street stops were of African-Americans. Add this to the disproportionate arrest and incarceration of black and brown people compared to the rest of the population, and the racist character of Chicago policing is exposed. The number of street stops had doubled by 2013 under the reign of police superintendent McCarthy. The official justification is the tough-on-crime targeting of ‘high crime areas’. These policies become self-fulfilling. To fill real or imagined quotas as evidence of anti-crime vigilance the stops ramp up, the arrests ramp up, and the resulting statistics add up to ‘higher’ crime—more cops, more stops, more shots. Couched in this argument is the assumption of guilt and an imagined black and Latino propensity for crime. National and local policies of controlling black and brown communities are shaped by this racist narrative. Control is the key. The police control the community. The only means of self-defense is to gain control over the police. Community control can be realized by an elected Civilian Police Accountability Council. CPAC must be the people’s demand. The black and brown body have been dehumanized and vilified. Routine stops are escalating to executions. The execution of Walter Scott in South Carolina was caught on video. The smear of the victim has become almost as viral as the video. Broken tail-light, missed child support payments, and he ran! Maybe he should have raised his hands like Michael Brown. Don’t forget to cuff the body.   ___________________________________________ Stop Police Crimes News Letter Column – Final Shot Take 1   Issue: March 3, 2015             OCCUPIED TERRITORIES Steve Craig, Stop Police Crimes Organizing CommitteeChicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression The ‘global war on terror’ and the domestic ‘war on crime’ continue to claim innocent victims framed by a delusional narrative of promoting democracy, order and security. This narrative is a thin veil draped over human rights abuses both on foreign soil and on the streets of Chicago. The reflexive U.S. response to political and social crises is to send in the troops. The shock troops, dressed in...

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How Do We Relate to the Current Mass Protests Against Police Crimes by Frank Chapman

Posted by on Dec 16, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

HOW DO WE RELATE TO THE CURRENT MASS PROTESTS AGAINST POLICE CRIMES Frank Chapman What does this spontaneous uprising of the masses tell us and how does it relate to our historic struggle for community control of the police? Of course the most obvious place to start is that this mass uprising is the manifestation of a new awakening of the people to the gross racist injustices that exist in our country. But isn’t it also a break away from the slavish submission to police and government authorities on the question of racist repression? This uprising is an expression of the mistrust created by an unjust and broken criminal justice system. Spontaneous movements by their very nature are not consciously based on an understanding of the necessity of collective resistance to bring about systemic changes. The present protest arise out of anger and outrage, their initial stages are outbursts characterized more by desperation and disgust than by organized struggle. At least this is how it seemingly jumped off in Ferguson on a hot day in August First the revolts began in Ferguson were clearly the resistance of African Americans to racist repression and its underlying oppression. In fact it is so obvious to so many that the Black people of Ferguson were justly outraged. How else can one explain the mass outpouring of support from all strands of the peoples’ progressive movement in the United States and around the world? When the oppressed at the bottom of the social ladder rattle their chains everyone takes notice. Simultaneous with the Ferguson uprising was a spontaneous movement of solidarity coming from the organized and unorganized, from masses of youth in the streets, to militant African American organizations, civil rights groups, labor unions, LGBTQ groups, youth and student organizations the organized left and peace and solidarity movements. Those of us who have lived through and were a part of the African American rebellions of the sixties know from experience that the present uprising has a greater depth and breadth than anything we’ve ever seen. Now in the wake of the grand jury refusing to indict the cops that killed Eric Garner we see a nation-wide youth led, protest/resistance movement developing with the potential of interrupting business as usual and confronting local and national authorities about doing away with the current racist practices of local police departments and prosecutors. However, this does not mean that the spontaneous awakening to the need to engage in political struggle is comparable to the sixties. The fight to end Jim Crow, the U.S. legalized version of Apartheid, was clearly a political struggle implying a radical transformation, an institutional rearrangement of society based on racial equality. The present protestors, while calling for the criminal justice system to hold the police accountable, also realize that they cannot depend on prosecutors to prosecute police. So it is clear that the system needs overhauling and those prosecutors, judges, and politicians are definitely not agents of change for the better. The paradox is clear. We are asking the worm to investigate his tail. We are asking the perpetrators of injustice for justice. What is the solution? The solution is a democratic one. We the people, the victims and survivors of police crimes, united with the broader democratic forces of the people must organize a massive campaign for an elected Civilian Police Accountability Council (CPAC) that empowers the people to hold the police accountable for the crimes they commit; puts communities in control of policing policies and procedures. This is a political demand that can only be won through mass struggle. This is...

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