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HoodHope – Struggle and the Power of the People, An interview with Real Deep

Posted by on Mar 4, 2015 in Articles | 0 comments

  HoodHope: Struggle and the Power of the People   An interview with Real Deep, Founder and Director of HoodHope in Chicago By Steve Craig, CAARPR Member   We’re speaking today with Real Deep, the founder and director of HoodHope, a storefront community center in the Woodlawn neighborhood.  Real has become a strong ally of CAARPR and our Stop Police Crimes campaign. Hood Hope has been graciously hosting weekly Stop Police Crimes community meetings at the center.  Hood Hope also serves as an organizing hub in the drive for an all elected Civilian Police Accountability Council (CPAC). Q: Could you describe the origins of HoodHope and your vision of its mission in the community? Real Deep: HoodHope Movement’s headquarters used to be  located on 61st and Saint Lawrence. Due to gentrification efforts by the University of Chicago, and the current alderman, Willie Cochran, as well as budgetary constraints, we were forced to vacate. Presently HoopHope meetings are being hosted at Farrell’s Barbershop located at 6426 South Cottage Grove. HoodHope was founded by me, on October 10, 2010, as I sat in Illinois Department of Correction. At that time I had already been incarcerated for 11 years. HoodHope was created to unite all organizations for the common cause of Justice for All. Our target market is the Hood, a people lost and forgotten.   Q: What activities are you currently working on? Any up-coming events? Real Deep: We are currently planning a fundraiser with Redline Movement, The Chicago Alliance [CAARPR], and the Chicago Hip Hop Legends to raise funds for a new community center. We also have a march approaching with the P.O.P.S Movement to celebrate their anniversary and bring awareness to the cause We are also in the production process with regard to products such as clothing, music, toilet paper, body oils and various other products and services which will be utilized to generate revenue to maintain the Movement.   These items will be promoting a positive message concerning justice.   Q: How has the community responded to your efforts? Are community members becoming actively involved? Real Deep: The community is welcoming HoodHope with open arms. We have partnered with several organizations and recruited a lot of youth for the Movement.   Q: What kind of challenges have you had to face? Real Deep: Two that come to mind  are dealing with sellout preachers/pastors and puppet politicians. My only other obstacle is monetary concerns.   Q: How can people contribute if they’re interested? Real Deep: Donations can be mailed to HoodHope Movement 650 West Englewood Ave, Chicago, IL, 60621, and electronic donation can be made at Rally.org at HoodHope Movement. These contributions will be used to open a new community center.   Q: You have recently become a staunch ally of CAARPR’s Stop Police Crimes campaign and the struggle for a Civilian Police Accountability Council (CPAC) how did this evolve? Real Deep: :   I saw the CAARPR people on the street passing out CPAC literature and buttons, being the voice for the voiceless.  I offered to share the spot I had with them for meetings.  Our cooperative connection was immediate and Divine.  My passion for justice and relationship to the community fuel a genuine dislike for tax-paid officials who are assigned to uphold the law but who actually break it.  I find that despicable and absolutely unacceptable. Q: Young African Americans from across the United States; from Ferguson to New York to Chicago and so on, are courageously and creatively leading the upraising against our racist system of police violence and terror, what have the young folks that you work with...

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Statement on the Murder of Trayvon Martin and the Aquittal of George Zimmerman

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 in Articles, News | 0 comments

For immediate release, July 15, 2013 For follow-up or more information contact Clarice Durham or Ted Pearson, 312-939-2750, or contact@naarpr.org. The following statement was released this morning by Clarice Durham and Ted Pearson, Co-Chairs of the Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression: The murder of Trayvon Martin and acquittal of George Zimmerman is another dagger in the heart of democracy Two things have occurred in the past month which indicate that African Americans have no rights that white law makers, police and racist vigilantes are bound to respect. The first was the U.S. Supreme Court gutting of the Voting Rights Act, characterizing it as “perpetual racial entitlements” and thereby perpetually entitling white representatives of ruling elites to disenfranchise African Americans in an effort to bring back Jim Crow. The second was the acquittal Saturday of George Zimmerman, murderer of Trayvon Martin. The acquittal of Zimmerman is another Rodney King case. A child was stalked and murdered by a wannabe cop. The jury of 5 white women and one Afro-Latina woman ignored this. There were no African Americans on that jury, no one who has experienced the racism and brutality delivered to Black people in the U.S., especially in Florida, for 500 years. Every African American mother and father has profound and new worries about the safety of their children. The acquittal of Zimmerman combined with the annulment of the Voting Rights Act by the Supreme Court late in June amount to a legal and political declaration that Black people have no rights that U. S. society is obliged to respect. Not only does the Zimmerman verdict endanger every African American, it is a fundamental challenge to democracy and the foundational principles of the Declaration of Independence. This is the betrayal of Reconstruction and Civil Rights all over again. All people in the United States, regardless of race, have a stake in preventing a second roll-back of African American rights. The first rollback, the betrayal of Reconstruction in 1877, resulted in undoing the most progressive legislation the country has seen in education and basic rights. It re-entrenched the most reactionary, anti-labor, racist, slave-holding elements in the South and in the United States Congress. In this time in which the far right is campaigning to crush Organized Labor, destroy the social safety net, and further enrich the already super-rich, the fight against these latest racist atrocities must unite us all, Black, white, Latino, Asian, women, youth, and LGBT people – everyone who values democracy. Gerald Horne, the noted historian, recently noted at the Chicago Alliance 2013 Human Rights Awards, that the Jim Crow South was “the place where slavery was most persistent was also the place where lynching was most prevalent and where today anti-union sentiment is the strongest… [No] progress nationally is secure unless we break the back of reaction in Dixie.” The state of Florida charged Zimmerman only after mass protests in the streets, and even when the state proceeded it did so faint-heartedly. Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi declared on national television following the verdict, “This case was never about race.” But that was precisely what the case was about. For one we know that prosecutors get the kind of juries they want, especially in the South and they usually get all white ones. This is like stacking the deck and announcing that the game is fair. The message of the verdict is that you can profile, stalk and kill an unarmed Black child in Florida and call it self-defense. This law was designed for white vigilante violence against African Americans. Historically, white racists have always claimed...

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Watch the video of the June 2013 Human Rights Awards Program

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

Saturday, June 15, 2013 40th Annual Human Rights Awards From the Wilmington Ten to Howard Morgan,  A Luta Continua – Free all Political Prisoners Keynote speaker – Gerald Horne, PhD Honorees: Jeff Baker, President of the Committee for a Better Chicago and leader in the struggle to Stop Police Crimes Lisa Brock, PhD, Academic Director of the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and longtime activist for human rights Karen Lewis, President of the Chicago Teachers Union and strong advocate for fair and effective public schools The People’s Law Office Staff, committed fighters for rights and justice for all prisoners, including freedom for those who have been wrongfully...

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Remarks of Gerald Horne, keynote speaker at CAARPR 2013 Human Rights Awards

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 in Articles, News | 0 comments

Remarks of Gerald Horne 2013 Human Rights Awards Chicago Illinois, June 15, 2013 It is difficult to overestimate my pleasure in returning to Chicago.  When Clarice Durham and Ted Pearson reached out to me, I accepted quickly not giving either an opportunity to change their minds.  I was sufficiently taciturn to avoid confessing that I would have paid them to come to Chicago to speak to an audience of political activists and progressive minded people. This is because Chicago historically has been in the vanguard of progressive change, going back to the times of the Haymarket martyrs whose sacrifice bequeathed to us the 8 hour day and May Day itself, the international workers’ holiday.  It was also in Chicago that the heroic Ida B. Wells-Barnett led a trailblazing crusade against lynching that has provided us with a template for struggle that exists to this very day:  Southern Solidarity and International Solidarity.  Southern solidarity in that the place where slavery was most persistent was also the place where lynching was most prevalent and where today anti-union sentiment is the strongest and that no progress nationally is secure unless we break the back of reaction in Dixie—and that in order to do this, we will have to enlist our friends in the international community.   Wells-Barnett realized this when in the 1890s she took her crusade against lynching—which disproportionately occurred in Dixie—to the shores of London.   Wells-Barnett also did not ignore the all important class question as she realized that the scourge that was lynching did not exclude Negroes who were affluent or powerful; in fact, the white supremacists disproportionately targeted this group, not least since their very existence undermined the fundamentals of white supremacy itself. It was also in Chicago that African-Americans began to take flight, a development that ultimately marked a great leap forward in the struggle against global and domestic fascism.  One can glimpse that of which I speak by perusing the neglected 1930s novel by George Schuyler, Black Empire, which featured Negro pilots bombing racists in Mississippi and colonialists in London.   It was approximately 95 years ago that a young woman of color from Texas, Bessie Coleman, moved to Chicago where she was befriended by the publisher of the Chicago Defender, Robert Abbott, who financed her successful effort to be trained as an airline pilot in France.  It was Coleman who inspired a future generation of black pilots including John Robinson of Chicago who migrated to Ethiopia in the mid-1930s where he played a pivotal role as a fighter pilot in the war against Italian fascism, then went on to serve as a founder of Ethiopian Airways, to this day one of the leading carriers on the continent.  Robinson was hailed by thousands upon returning to Chicago after his return from East Africa in the 1930s, then was hailed by thousands more when he perished in an air crash in Ethiopia in the 1950s—one of the few individuals to be celebrated on two continents. Robinson, however, was not alone.  James Peck, was a Black American pilot who fought during the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s alongside the progressive forces—including many Mexicanos and Puerto Riquenos–in one of the most important conflicts of the 20th century; he was also a great writer and his book, published in 1940, ‘Armies with Wings’ is one of the few accounts published to this day telling how it feels to kill from the air—a work that could usefully be consulted by drone operators today. Because those like Robinson and Peck did not shrink from fighting fascism abroad, we were placed in an advantageous...

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We Demand the Removal of Asata Shakur from the FBI's Terrorist List

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 in Articles, News | 0 comments

May 6, 2013 Frank Chapman blasted the FBI for placing Asata Shakur on the FBI’s “Most Wanted Terrorist” list last week.  Chapman is Field Organizer and Education Director of the Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression.  Shakur is a former Black Panther and Black Liberation Army member.  She was placed on the FBI’s “Most Wanted Terrorist” list on May 2, 2013, 40 years after she was charged in the killing of a New Jersey State Police trooper on the New Jersey Turnpike in 1973.  The FBI added $1 million to New Jersey’s outstanding $1 million reward for her capture, bringing the total maximum reward to $2 million. Shakur has been living in Cuba in political asylum ever since she escaped from prison in 1979. Lennox Hinds, her attorney of many years, stated Friday on “Democracy Now”  that the wounds she suffered in the shootout that would not have allowed her to even hold a weapon, let alone fire one.  Nothing she has done fits the definition of terrorism.  Read More Open Letter to Attorney General Erik H....

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Open Letter to Anita Alvarez

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 in Articles, News | 0 comments

Open Letter to Anita Alvarez

AN OPEN LETTER CHARGING STATE’S ATTORNEY ANITA ALVAREZ WITH BEING A PERSECUTOR OF THE PEOPLE INSTEAD OF A PROSECUTOR FOR THE PEOPLE. View the video by Mike Siviwe Elliot of the presentation of the letter to a representative of Alvarez:   Anita Alvarez Cook County State’s Attorney 69 W. Washington Suite 3200 Chicago IL 60602-3174 December 12, 2012 We, the Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression and our task force, designated the Organizing Committee to Stop Police Crimes, in this open letter and/or communiqué to the Cook County State’s Attorney do hereby make the following charges and demands: We Charge That: 1. You were elected to be the peoples prosecutor but you have earned a reputation as “prosecutor and persecutor of the people,” instead of doing the job you are sworn to perform as the prosecutor on behalf of the people. You have zealously harassed, persecuted and prosecuted African American and Latino men and women and innocent peace activists. Yet you have done nothing to bring to justice the Chicago Police executioners of innocent Black men and women and have rebuffed their families. 2. You appeared on national television (“60 Minutes,” December 9, 2012, http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50136707n) and proclaimed that men who have been exonerated of heinous crimes are still guilty in your opinion, even though you personally admit your office did not examine the evidence.  You have spun most outrageous theories of how “it could happen” that those proven innocent could still be guilty. 3. You have done nothing to bring to justice the murderer of Rekia Boyd, an off-duty police officer Dante Servin.  Boyd was an innocent bystander and was killed on March 22, 2012 when Servin shot at Antonio Cross, who was also unarmed and innocent of any wrongdoing. 4. You have done nothing to bring to justice Police Officer Gildardo Sierra, the murderer of Flint Farmer.  Sierra was video recorded shooting the unarmed Farmer three times in the back as he lay face down and wounded on the ground.   You have told news media the FBI is looking into the case; why aren’t you?  Murder is a state crime. 5. You have done nothing to prosecute the police who killed Dakota Bright, Marquise Sampson, and countless other young African Americans. 6. You twice prosecuted and then imprisoned former police officer Howard Morgan, whom police tried to kill shooting him 28 times, for attempted murder, when the only material non-police evidence clearly established he was a victim of attempted murder by the police and a jury found that he had not fired a gun at anyone. 7. You have done nothing to investigate and prosecute those responsible for the Area Two Lockup “suicides” of Develt Bradford and Melvin Woods shortly after midnight, when the constant video surveillance cameras were mysteriously turned off. 8. You resisted prosecuting Richard J. Vanecko in the 2004 murder of David Koschman and participated in the cover-up of the crime because Vanecko was a nephew of your former boss, Richard M. Daley. 9. You have done nothing to prosecute the detectives who brutally beat Greg Malandrucco and Matthew Clark almost three years ago and the other officers who attempted to cover up the assault. You have refused to release the names of these officers or their duty status. 10. You have tolerated and encouraged the use of police agents provocateur who fomented violence and sought to entrap 5 innocent activists protesting the NATO military organization in Chicago last summer. 11. You have tolerated and even cooperated with reckless endangerment of youth when police have colluded with known criminal elements.  Police car videos have...

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